Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
Earthscope Transportable Array station
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
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The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics is located in La Jolla, and is strongly linked to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) through joint faculty appointments, research interests, and shared facilities.

News and Events

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has posted the committee report from the second, and final, phase of the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.  The congressionally mandated study (http://www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=21874), conducted by 17 distinguished scientists and engineers, including IGPP’s John Orcutt, has determined that the Fukushima accident offers a "wake-up call" as to the risks nuclear fuel pools pose to health and safety.  To that end, the committee recommends "that the U.S. nuclear industry and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission improve the ability of plant operators to measure real-time conditions in spent fuel pools and maintain adequate cooling of stored spent fuel during severe accidents and terrorist attacks.” The report, "Lessons Learned From the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants” is available here: http://www.nap.edu/catalog/21874/lessons-learned-from-the-fukushima-nucl...

Want to know more about the "Glamorous Life of a Geophysicist"? IGPP's John DeSanto has been keeping a blog that will allow followers to do just that! DeSanto's current post, "Science in The Middle of Nowhere" cleverly explains the scientific process of measuring the depth of and movement along the ocean floor: The multibeam sonar "sends out a sound pulse at regular intervals and listens to the reflections of the pulse from the seafloor...the sound pulse from the multibeam sounds like a bird chirping. You can hear this chirp throughout the entire ship every ten seconds or so, 24/7. Now I know there are quite a few bird-lovers out there, but I can’t help but ask: Would you still love your birds when they are keeping you up at night?" Read this and other astute observations by DeSanto here: http://geophysicslife.blogspot.com

IGPP Post-Doc Matthew Siegfried is one of three emerging researchers to have their NSF-funded Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project-related research recently published. Siegfrield's West Antarctica Ice-sheet, Subglacial Lake Whillans findings appeared in the 16 March 2016 issue of Geophysical Research Letters (http://goo.gl/CuCTLK).

People may hear SIegfried's first-hand account of his research by attending the 4 May 2016 Polar Seminar (2pm, IGPP, Revelle Room 4301). His talk is titled "From WISSARD to SALSA: The role of subglacial lakes in West Antarctica through a multidisciplinary lens."

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